Anonymous Hackers Pwn Drone Company >9000

 

Anonymous hackers have defaced the home page of Alpha Unmanned Systems, a company based in Spain which claims to be:

experts in designing simple and portable Flight Control Systems. The company is based on over 25 years of combined experience in the field of aircraft control systems. UAV Navigation designs and manufactures the most advanced Flight Control Systems (FCS) for UAV and General Aviation on the market.

At the time of this writing the front page displayed the following message:

pwned
ALL THE DRONES TANGO DOWN!!!
This is just another covert corporation funded by the CIA.
And just as uavnavigation.com you have been hacked. Manual remote control of the UAVs plus the video
transmission, both without a proper encryption? Are you serious? Guess some border patrols and law
enforcement fags will soon miss some drones…LULZ, YOUR LEVEL OF FAILURE IS OVER 9000!!!

FREE BRADLEY MANNING!!!
STOP THE TORTURING AND KILLING of peaceful people in Syria and Bahrain!!!
STOP ATTACKING peaceful “occupy” protesters in USA, Canada, Germany, and all over the world!!!
CLOSE GUANTANAMO BAY!!!

And for god’s sake, stop that Orwellian INDECT bullshit NOW!!!
Guys like you are nothing but tools of the terrorists of this world.
Terrorists like Bashar al-Assad (regime of Syria), Barack Obama (regime of USA) and King Hamad (regime of Bahrain).

And once more, for god’s sake:

FREE BRADLEY MANNING, finally!!!

We are Anonymous,
we are legion,
we do not forgive,
we do not forget,
you should have expected us!

The final taunting paragraph will probably get some IT guys in trouble and cause some massive havoc:

Oh…Your password for the admin panel was not safe, so we allowed ourselves to change it.
The other files from this server were wiped, so feel free to restore the backup from the NAS,
it may or may not contain a trojan… FOR THE LULZ!!! Power to the people! Hack the planet!

The Anonymous hackers’ reason for taking over the site, as explained in the video posted on Alpha Unmanned Systems’ home page is:

Since 2009, the EU has been subsidizing the INDECT project with millions of Euros.
Even though several media outlets have already reported about this networked surveillance technology, only few EU citizens know what it is supposed to be.

The application of INDECT aims to analyze conspicuous behavior to prevent crimes, in virtual life as well as in real life, before they actually happen. Not only does this sound crazy, it is cutting deeply into our basic right to privacy, because those cameras will be able to replicate scanned personal biometrical features with existing digital files about persons in databases such as social networks. Hence, every person could be retraced and supervised, anybody who says or does anything “abnormal” or anything which the system considers to be “threatening” both on the internet and in real life, is potentially suspicious….

INDECT is a European Union project which:

aims at developing tools for enhancing the security of citizens and protecting the confidentiality of recorded and stored information as well as the privacy of involved persons. INDECT targets threat detection in both real environments (intelligent cameras) and virtual environments (computer networks, especially Internet).

The five-year project began in 2009, at which time the Telegraph UK, which deemed the project “Orwellian,” reported that the project received  £10 million in funding from the European Union and that the EU had already increased the crime fighting budgets 13.5% to £900 million. The newspaper further reported:

The European Commission is calling for a “common culture” of law enforcement to be developed across the EU and for a third of police officers – more than 50,000 in the UK alone – to be given training in European affairs within the next five years.

According to the Open Europe think tank, the increased emphasis on co-operation and sharing intelligence means that European police forces are likely to gain access to sensitive information held by UK police, including the British DNA database. It also expects the number of UK citizens extradited under the controversial European Arrest Warrant to triple.

Stephen Booth, an Open Europe analyst who has helped compile a dossier on the European justice agenda, said these developments and projects such as Indect sounded “Orwellian” and raised serious questions about individual liberty.

“This is all pretty scary stuff in my book. These projects would involve a huge invasion of privacy and citizens need to ask themselves whether the EU should be spending their taxes on them,” he said.

“The EU lacks sufficient checks and balances and there is no evidence that anyone has ever asked ‘is this actually in the best interests of our citizens?’”

On May 16, UAVnavigation, another Spanish company specializing in unmanned air vehicles, was hit by Anonymous. UAV Navigation produces one of two flight control systems capable of handling unmanned helicopters.  A Google search shows that UAV Navigation’s main site is still down and Twitter has Anonymous taking credit.

From SpainTechnology.com:

The Spanish company UAV Navigation is positioned at the highest level of this competitive field, thanks to its systems for both unmanned aircraft and helicopters. In fact, because of the complexity of the latter, there are only two flight control systems in the world capable of handling them. And the system from UAV Navigation is one of them…

The company has created the unit UAV Navigation Inc in the United States and recently opened an office in Manassas, Virginia, in order to increase its penetration in the North American market.

UAV Navigation’s US website is still up.

Here’s a partial screenshot of Alpha Unmanned Systems’ home page as of this writing:

Anonymous Hits Syrian Govt Site: “World Stands with You Against Brutal Regime”

Anonymous computer hacktivists  landed on the Syrian government’s website (Monday morning 8/8/11 in Syria) http://mod.gov.sy/ leaving their logo and a message to the Syrian people in English and Arabic:

To the Syrian people: The world stands with you against the brutal regime of Bashar Al-Assad. Know that time and history are on your side – tyrants use violence because they have nothing else, and the more violent they are, the more fragile they become. We salute your determination to be non-violent in the face of the regime’s brutality, and admire your willingness to pursue justice, not mere revenge. All tyrants will fall, and thanks to your bravery Bashar Al-Assad is next.
To the Syrian military: You are responsible for protecting the Syrian people, and anyone who orders you to kill women, children, and the elderly deserves to be tried for treason. No outside enemy could do as much damage to Syria as Bashar Al-Assad has done. Defend your country – rise up against the regime! – Anonymous
The hack falls in the middle of Ramadan. It was up from at least 9:30 pm west coast time and is still up at press time. UPDATE: By 12:30 am west coast time, the Syrian government’s site was not responding, either because of high traffic or because the government had pulled it down.

The logo of a torso with a question mark instead of head explicates the idea that Anonymous is a headless (dis)organization; there is no leader, as well as reference the Sixties motto “Question Authority.” Anonymous came out of the 4Chan pages, a NSFW image sharing site, and began their activism staging global masked protests against  Scientology and that organization’s abuses of civil rights. Since the success of that campaign, the WhyWeProtest.net aspect of Anonymous has expanded to embrace the uprisings in Iran and fight against censorship and for free exchange of information. Many also take issue with what they see as oppressive copyright restrictions.

 

Anonymous hacks in support of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange included taking over the non-transactional pages of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal to protest the institutions’ refusal to process payments designated for Assange’s defense. The Swedish government website was defaced this year by Anonymous in support of Assange. Other government sites including those of Maylasia, Zimbabwe, Tunisia, and Egypt have also been attacked. And the Westboro Baptist Church was hacked.  Basically a bunch of people in an IRC chat room will discover they have an affinity on certain issues, recruit some other like-minded folks and go do something.  The internet–with the right tools–allows anyone to be anonymous/Anonymous.
Recently LulzSec/AntiSec, which emerged from Anonymous, have hacked into government and law enforcement websites, as well websites of security companies such as HB Gary, as well as Sony. A Portuguese man was arrested then released in the LulzSec investigation, while a member of the anti-Scientology branch of Anonymous in Sweden was mistakenly named by internet vigilantes as  Topiary, the alleged the head of LulzSec/AntiSec, after the arrest of a teenager in the Shetland Islands.  The English teen has been charged, resulting in a retaliatory hack of 70 law enforcement websites, compromising 10 gigabytes of information:

We are doing this in solidarity with Topiary and the Anonymous PayPal LOIC defendants as well as all other political prisoners who are facing the gun of the crooked court system.

The Syrian hack–which follows the hacks of other repressive states in the Middle East–is a major move for a  branch/few people/many (?) Anonymous, showing they mean srs bsns when it comes to freedom and democracy, and that for this bunch, their hacktivies are focused on more that just teh lulz. Other Anonymous activities include supporting the current large scale demonstrations in Israel and Chile, and  encouraging voting in Argentina’s elections last week.

(for a good, in depth look at Anonymous, check out this edition of The Stream from late June of this year. The Anonymous segment begins at 22:48 and includes a live interview with an Anon who explains the Anonymous philosophy and the hows and whys of Anonymous political involvement, as a well as discussion about new forms of democracy evolving out of social media and cyberspace.)

Finally an Intelligent Use for Cupcakes: Hacking Terrorist Sites


I am so over cupcakes. They are twee, precious and ghastly. Which is why I revel in the hideous show Cupcake Wars where cutesy and/or sincere bakers compete to have their creations featured at a semi-high profile event, like a car show or fashion launch. The twist: Bakers must use ingredients inspired by the party–like roast turkey, red licorice, Cheetos, or popcorn. The failures are phenomenal, the critiques fabulously snarky. Unfortunately no one has called them “crap cakes” yet, but I still have half a season saved on DVR to hope for that.

Thankfully  the loathsomely adorable dessert has finally gone to war in a much better way, and not as substitute for grenades, though seriously, some are only suited for that.  No, now cupcakes have joined the War on Terror!

The British intelligence service MI6 hacked into Al Qaeda’s online English language magazine Inspire, produced by radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, and replaced the sugar-filled article “Make a bomb in the Kitchen of your Mom” with a page of recipes for “The Best Cupcakes in America” published by the Ellen DeGeneres chat show.

Nothing like a nice mojito cupcake slathered in vanilla butter cream frosting to convert a potentially violent villain into a peace loving hipster.

The Telegraph UK reports that the cyber squad also removed articles by Osama bin Laden, his deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri and a piece called “What to expect in Jihad.” The United States, which knew of the Inspire website declined to get involved:

A Pentagon operation, backed by Gen Keith Alexander, the head of US Cyber Command, was blocked by the CIA which argued that it would expose sources and methods and disrupt an important source of intelligence, according to a report in America.

Inspire magazine was back online in two weeks, but agents will continue the merry prankstering. I hope they will consider substituting a few pages of Pamela Des Barres awesome rock n roll memoir I’m with the Band for an article on how to recruit for a terrorist cell….

 

 

[photo: creative commons, Rachel Kramer Bussel]


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