Ender’s Game: Gay Hating Sci-Fi Author Names Villains “Buggers,” Advocates Govt. Overthrow

Okay yes that’s an extreme headline, but here’s what Orson Scott Card, author of the  Ender’s Game series, wrote in 2008 about marriage equality:

What these dictator-judges do not seem to understand is that their authority extends only as far as people choose to obey them.

How long before married people answer the dictators thus: Regardless of law, marriage has only one definition, and any government that attempts to change it is my mortal enemy. I will act to destroy that government and bring it down, so it can be replaced with a government that will respect and support marriage, and help me raise my children in a society where they will expect to marry in their turn.

Card is on the Board of Directors of the National Organization for Marriage, and one can only surmise that some of the money he has made from writing the Ender’s Game series, selling the rights to the book and being a producer on the film have gone, and may continue to go to fight marriage equality. (You don’t get on the Board of Directors for any organization with a simple $23 donation. You donate pay. A lot)

Geek’s Out has called for a boycott of  the film version of Ender’s Game due to open in the U.S. on November 1 because of the author’s extreme, gay-loathing views. The film’s producers Robert Orci in the Wall Street Journal:

I was never aware of in the book – and we’ve read it three or four times during our lifetime before we got into this movie – I never saw any sign in “Ender’s Game” of anything that offended Alex [Kurtzman, co-producer] or me.

Dude, seriously? WTF! The villains who take over Earth are called Buggers. BUGGERS. A derogatory term for male homosexuals (and yes, I know I am typing the term “homosexual” which is considered derogatory but it’s to point out the utter archaic hatred Card displays for LGBTQ).  So in what universe (except Card’s hate-filled one?) is it okay to call another lifeform (especially the “bad guys”) by a hateful epithet? Like, wouldn’t seeing an invading force called words I never say and cringe when I hear be a tip off that maybe you’d want to reconsider the whole idea?

Wait, let’s back up a second. The producers were not offended by villains called Buggers. At all. Okay that’s it. I want back the $7.50 I spent for Star Trek: Into Darkness, aka Enterprise 90210.2 because clearly the people behind it are either liars or morons.

Stuff comes out when writers write, when you fall through a page the unconscious and subconscious take over, and fiction writers also use their work to consciously push their own agenda (In Battlefield Earth, author L. Ron Hubbard, who loathed psychiatrists and referred to them in his logorrheic non-fiction as “psychs,” called his bad guys “Psychlos.” Oh gods, please let Ender’s Game be as big a flop as Battlefield Earth and whatever that last Will Smith movie was). Even without Card’s hateful bile and NOMing, wouldn’t the terms “buggers” be a tip off that something is a leetle odd? One sci-fi fan I spoke with said:

strange term to use in the 80s – everyone knows what it meant

How could the producers have ignored that?
As the Geek’s Out call for boycott/avoidance of the Ender’s Game movie gain momentum, Card released a statement to Entertainment Weekly:

Ender’s Game is set more than a century in the future and has nothing to do with political issues that did not exist when the book was written in 1984.

With the recent Supreme Court ruling, the gay marriage issue becomes moot.  The Full Faith and Credit clause of the Constitution will, sooner or later, give legal force in every state to any marriage contract recognized by any other state.

Now it will be interesting to see whether the victorious proponents of gay marriage will show tolerance toward those who disagreed with them when the issue was still in dispute.

Orson Scott Card

There’s a difference between tolerance and acceptance. Tolerance, Orson, means your movie will be released and people will walk past the ticket booth without a second glance. Acceptance means we would pay to see it. And we won’t be.

(BTW, Card’s comment about the “political issues that did not exist when the books was written” is BS. According Wikipedia, Card revised Ender’s Game in 1991, making several minor changes to reflect the political climates of the time, including the decline of the Soviet Union. Why would he revise his book to reflect the decline of the USSR, if as he claims his book has nothing do to current politics, but rather those a century in the future?).

HT PoliCyBear

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