Late Night: “Brady Bunch” Goes Modern

The “Brady Bunch” is getting some modern touches for a 21st century relaunch: Mike and Carol were previously married, and their respective ex-spouses are still in their lives. Plus, they have a kid together. No word regarding Alice or Sam the Butcher’s revised characters (the best butcher shop I know in Los Angeles, Lindy and Grundy, is run by a lovely couple, Amelia and Erika, so butcher shops still exist, and Alice might end up being an older tattooed hipster nanny/manny which could be interesting). Vince Vaughn is producing, and the project is at CBS

Growing up in SoCal, where almost everyone I knew was a kid with divorced parents like me, both The Brady Bunch and The Partridge Family seemed to be about divorce, and a way of helping kids cope with being in a blended family (as we call them now), or having a single parent. I always wanted an episode of  The Partridge Family where the kids’ dad reappears and wants to take Danny with him…

Deadline Hollywood, which broke the story, points out that in 1969, the show’s creator Sherwood Schwartz (the man behind My Favorite Martian and Gilligan’s Island), a true television genius who addresses vital societal issues in his sitcoms:

 wanted Carol to be a divorcée but the network refused, so the end of her first marriage was never addressed.

My, how things have changed.

62 Responses to "Late Night: “Brady Bunch” Goes Modern"
DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:04 pm 1

Lisa!

Growing up in Oklahoma in the 50s and 60s, I only knew 3 people whose parents were divorced. I am not sure that my son, who is 39, knows that many whose parents are not divorced. A point I make to my classes when talking about how marriage and family respond to economic and social factors.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:09 pm 2

I never understood the allure of that show. I was never much of a Brady Bunch fan though I fall right into the demographic the show was designed to appeal to. Until about 1972, I only knew of one woman who was divorced and raising her sons alone and though their ages mirrored mine and my brothers’ almost precisely, they wouldn’t talk about their dad much at all. I understand he was a real dick and might even have been in prison. Such things weren’t even whispered about in the 1960s!


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:10 pm 3
In response to Margaret @ 2

Yeah, I’m afraid this one goes over my head too. But then, most TV does.


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:12 pm 4
In response to Margaret @ 2

Same here.


demi | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:15 pm 5

Oh, you guys are just so pure!
I’m smiling when I say that, I hope ya know.
I was always jealous of the kids whose parents were divorced.
It didn’t seem all that Happy at my house.
I have more to say, but, probably not appropriate here.
Cool evening, sort of, a little humid, but we did take the dog to the park for a walkie earlier.
Hi Hi.


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:17 pm 6
In response to demi @ 5

Hey, Demi! Have to say that my home life as a kid was pretty Ozzie & Harriet (at least until I hit puberty and started shaking things up).


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:19 pm 7

The show was a friday night show for kids and was followed by The Pratridge Family (8pm and 8:30 pm respectively).. I thought the Brady bunch was unrelistic, evne as a kid. But thanks to Tiger Beat and other teen mags, lots of boys and girls had crushes on all the family members (see My First Gay Crush) Paul V.’s GREAT companion site to Born This Way–which will be a book this fall)


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:19 pm 8

Sure is strange that a show that didn’t even run five full years, (according to wiki), is considered such a television classic but then a low budget science fiction show with a terrible lead actor that didn’t even make it three full seasons spawned a couple of dozen movies and 25 years worth of television sequels and related material.


demi | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:20 pm 9
In response to DrDick @ 6

Hey, me too, I think. I have always been Too Sensitive, and picked up on a lot of stuff that my sisters didn’t. I ask them Do they remember this or that, and they don’t. It’s a sometimes curse, I guess.
I Did in fact shake things up too. Something in our decision making stuff.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:21 pm 10
In response to DrDick @ 6

LMAO! No Ozzie and Harriet for me! My parents hated each other and were staying together “for the sake of the children”, which is something else I never understood. For the sake of making the children as miserable as they were?


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:23 pm 11
In response to Margaret @ 8

I can’t speak for “The Brady Bunch,” but the original “Star Trek” was grossly mishandled in its own time. All anyone looked at then was raw viewer numbers, and those never looked too great. Funny thing is, though, that if they’d broken down the numbers by age, they would have realized that Trek was a runaway hit in the 18-30 bracket–exactly where you’d expect a science-fiction series to have its greatest popularity.

Oh, well, it’s not as if anyone ever praised network executives for their vast intelligence.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:23 pm 12
In response to demi @ 9

Oh yeah, and talk about shaking things up! My adolescence was…interesting…for all involved…


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:26 pm 13
In response to Margaret @ 10

Mine not only loved each other, but were best friends. Even back then, they made all decisions jointly and my father, who could be pretty dominant, deliberately dialed it back so my more passive mother would press her side of things. I sometimes think that part of the reason I am so bad at marriage is because they were so good at it. I really did not have any role models for conflict resolution since they seldom had any and never in front of us kids.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:26 pm 14
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 11

Oh yeah, I’m aware of all that. And heaven forbid they actually hire a scientist to help with the scripts. I’ve been watching remastered Star Trek episodes and while the new CG exterior scenes are beautiful to behold, there is no helping those scripts in some places…


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:28 pm 15
In response to DrDick @ 13

Hmmm….I don’t know you outside our little exchanges here but you seem funny, very smart, responsible and fun to be around. Are you sure it’s you who’s bad at marriage?


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:29 pm 16
In response to Margaret @ 14

Those shows really were pretty hokey, though I was a devoted fan at the time. Of course I was also a total sci-fi geek then as well.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:30 pm 17
In response to Margaret @ 14

I’m sure NBC was too damned cheap to consider a real science advisor; we can count ourselves lucky that the standing sets and the Enterprise model looked as good as they did. Yeah, we just got the remastered first season, and there are some pretty bad moments…but when classic Trek was good, it was really good.


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:30 pm 18
In response to Margaret @ 15

I will cop to at least some of the responsibility, but I will also admit that part of my problem has been the marriage choices I made.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:33 pm 19
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 17

but when classic Trek was good, it was really good.

Definitely! And with the fabulousness that is William Shatner, it’s always been easy to overlook the rotten science. Either that or it was just eclipsed by the cheese.


Becca | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:33 pm 20

Oh fer crissake… Hollywood really has run out of original ideas, hasn’t it?

Every bloody thing they make anymore is a sequel, remake, reboot, or adaptation of someone’s decades-old original creative idea.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:35 pm 21
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 11

The original Star Trek was genius! The first episode I ever saw was the one with the black cat that turns into a woman. I was supposed ot be in bed but my mom feel asleep wiht TV on so a watched it until she woke up.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:35 pm 22
In response to Becca @ 20

Isn’t it? Or a so-called “reality show”. That way they don’t even have to pay guild writers. For that reason alone, (and there are others), I refuse to watch them.


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:36 pm 23
In response to Margaret @ 19

And that is some fine, ripe cheese indeed!


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:36 pm 24
In response to Becca @ 20

This is what happens when you let “the suits” (MBAs and CPAs) take charge.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:37 pm 25
In response to Margaret @ 19

I seem to remember Nicholas Meyer once saying that the way he directed the Shat in STII was to run take after grinding take until Shatner burned off all his excess energy. At that point, it was possible to get a reasonably decent acting job out of him.


spocko | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:37 pm 26
In response to Margaret @ 8

a low budget science fiction show with a terrible lead actor

Ah, but the OTHER members of the cast were great. :-)


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:38 pm 27
In response to spocko @ 26

I always had a soft spot for Spock and Scotty. ;-)


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:38 pm 28
In response to Margaret @ 22

Good choice, I think. Too bad people seem to be willing to watch whatever tripe is forced into their eyeballs–if the networks lost enough money on reality TV, they might actually be forced to pay writers again.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:38 pm 29
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 21

Wow! I don’t know if I remember the first episode I saw but I’m pretty sure it was the second aired pilot, “Where No Man Has Gone Before”, which had some damn good matte paintings in it. My parents were big ol’ sci-fi geeks so we would have watched it.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:39 pm 30
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 17

Did anyone here ever read Dsvid Gerrold’s book “The Trouble with Tribbles” about his being a Star trek fan and aspiring actor/screenwriter; he wrote script on spec and it got bought, then wrote a book about it and Star Trek.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:41 pm 31
In response to spocko @ 26

Yes, they were and Deforrest Kelly at least was a huge name when the series began. But don’t get me wrong. William Shatner was wonderful in his horrible acting! Kinda like Fred Phelps is too stupid to be offensive, Shatner was so bad he was an instant classic.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:41 pm 32
In response to Margaret @ 29

The earliest episode I remember watching was “Devil in the Dark” (in reruns. I was born during the first run of the second season).


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:42 pm 33
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 30

I did! w00t! Did your copy have a bunch of black and white production photos in the middle too?


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:44 pm 34
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 32

I would have been seven then. I remember watching the Adam West Batman before time for Star Trek to come on.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:44 pm 35
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 30

I did read it, but that was probably thirty years ago.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:46 pm 36
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 35

Yeah, it would be closer to forty years for me…


spocko | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:47 pm 37
In response to Margaret @ 29

As you can imagine I’m a huge Star Trek fan and I find that the interesting things about the shows for me early on was the “BEM” (Bug Eyed Monsters” gadgets and spaceships, but as I got older I came to appreciate the little morality plays that they were.
Then later the ethical dilemmas that they brought up.

For example one of my favorites of TNG was “The Measure of a Man” where the federation was deciding was Data Property or a Person.

For that reason I LOVED Battle Star Galactica, the reboot. In one episode they were dealing with, cloning, artificial intelligence, political corruption and abortion. Great acting too.
I convinced Mrs. Spocko to watch it with me and she got hooked on the long form stories and the characters. She is a big fan of “The Wire” and she compares it to that for people who aren’t SF fans.
(We finally watched Friday Night Lights because some one said, ‘Do you like long form story telling and great characters like in The Wire and BSG? Well then watch Friday Night Lights, it’s not really about football and a small town in Texas.”


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:48 pm 38

I puffy heart The Shat. He was in a short series about shooting a reality show about a UFO movie in a small town–it was a total gag, and then he came to love the towns peole (redemption scene!) and gave them all super cool presents to make their dreams come true. My friend Kirk Murphey was in it, and he said Shat was super nice ot cast afterwards, staying in touch, inviting them over to watch football etc.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:48 pm 39

Wait! I remember the first episode I ever saw was “The Corbomite Maneuver”. I remember because it had Clint Howard in it and that’s the first time I ever saw him.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:49 pm 40
In response to spocko @ 37

I was and am a huge BSG fan. One of the few reboots that leaves the original in the dust.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:51 pm 41
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 38

Oh I’ve heard Shatner is just the nicest guy and a real charmer. If you haven’t, you should read “Get a Life”. My friend Anne MADE me read that thing and I’ve never regretted it.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:52 pm 42
In response to Margaret @ 40

I’ll admit I only saw a few episodes from the first season of the BSG reboot, but it seemed pretty good to me. I hear it got awfully bleak by the end, though, and I’ll have to admit that I’m wearing out on that level of “gritty realism.”


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:54 pm 43
In response to Margaret @ 39

He was scary looking! I remember the “grupp! grupp! grupp!” episode where anyone over 30 got blue stuff on them and died.


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:55 pm 44
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 42

Well you can skip most of the third season of BSG and not miss much. Yeah, kinda like it’s predecessor, they really didn’t seem to know where they were going with it and when.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:55 pm 45

And yoeman Janice’s basket weave hairdo!


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:56 pm 46

That’s it for me pups o’ fire. Tomorrow comes early and I ain’t twenty anymore. Thanks for the conversation! Oya!


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:57 pm 47
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 45

GoodMrsPuma refuses to believe that’s her real hair. Me, I figure it’s the 1960s…funky hair is just par for the course.


DrDick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:57 pm 48
In response to Margaret @ 46

Night! Think I will toddle off as well. Take care all!


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:58 pm 49

Good night to the exodees!


Margaret | Tuesday July 31, 2012 08:59 pm 50
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 45

And those incredibly, ridiculously short tunics! Yeah, that’s what I want to explore an unknown planet in: Mini dress, black hose and go-go boots.

The really screwed up thing is…. I now own one and I’ve been to a convention in it. Science blue, complete with tricorder.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:01 pm 51
In response to Margaret @ 50

They seem ridiculous today, but they were meant to be feminist haute coiture…


Dearie | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:02 pm 52

Talking the diving Mr. Shatner…. never a sci-phi fan, I didn’t know much about the man. And then along came Boston Legal……well, damn…. Shatner was remarkable and wonderful and I wished it had gone on forever.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:04 pm 53
In response to Margaret @ 50

WOW! VERY COOL!


Dearie | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:05 pm 54

“diving” of course is “devine”….. but then I missed Dr.Dick’s calling it a night and threadus interruptus.


Crane-Station | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:06 pm 55

Well, I grew up with this show. Read the book about some of the spectacular conflicts between the Robert Reed (?) RIP and Schwartz, because Reed was for real a serious stage actor and had issues with some of the scripts.

Sorry if I am on the wrong subject, just glanced at the video and jumped in.

I seriously question your true LA residency if you haven’t eaten at Sushi Nozawa in Studio City:
http://www.sushinozawa.com/

Wait. It closed? Guess the owner, who I am convinced Seinfeld modeled the Soup Nazi after, is moving his focus to Sugarfish. What the actual fuck?


ChristineEdmonson | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:19 pm 56
In response to Crane-Station @ 55

I never watched this show, but I sure loved this thread! Hey Pups, good job and see you DrDick and Margaret another night.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:20 pm 57
In response to Crane-Station @ 55

I prefer Sushi Ike on Hollywood and Gower; Ike (ee-kay) used to work at Sushi Nozawa nad is rad good. I alos like like Sushi Gen in Little Tokyo (they did an omakasi sushi selection for me featuring shiso leaves because I asked after tasting them at Sushi Ike on scallops)

Sugarfish is going to have limited menu and be more user friendly.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:21 pm 58

Oh, and i am an Angeleno by birth and now by choice. Don’t even question my ability to short cut through the hills during rush hour.


spocko | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:29 pm 59

Lisa Derrick | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:30 pm 60

FYI, Gore Vidal has died. RIP you feisty, talented intellect!


Dearie | Tuesday July 31, 2012 09:55 pm 61

And Maeve Binchy. It’s been a hard summer on our old folks.


Crane-Station | Tuesday July 31, 2012 11:45 pm 62
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 57

“Sugarfish is going to have limited menu and be more user friendly.”

LOL! I’ll bet it’ll be a sure hit in LA!


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