Mormons Posthumously Baptized Slain Reporter Daniel Pearl

The Mormon practice of baptizing dead people who aren’t Mormons has just hit a new low.  Last week it was revealed that Anne Frank was posthumously baptized for the  ninth time, and now the Boston Globe reports that Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, who was kidnapped and slain by Islamic terrorists in Karachi, Pakistan, in 2002, was posthumously baptized in June, 2011. The proxy baptism  was conducted in a Mormon temple in Twin Falls, Idaho.

Pearl’s family was not notified of his forced afterlife conversion at the time, and only learned of it from the Globe. Pearl’s widow Mariane said the baptism showed

lack of respect for Danny and a lack of respect for his parents

while his mother said,

As a matter of ethics, I think it’s wrong.

Mormons are technically only supposed to proxy baptize family members into the faith, one of the main reasons for church’s maintenance of detailed genealogical records.  According to church officials, Pearl’s baptism was a

serious breach of protocol

because it was not performed by a relative.  Anne Frank’s ninth baptism occurred in the Dominican Republic. It seems unlikely that any of her relatives were involved in the ceremony, which involves teenage Mormons taking the name of the deceased before being dunked in a pool supported by carvings of twelve oxen which represent the Twelve Tribes of Israel. The purpose of proxy baptism is to allow the souls of the deceased to meet up with their kin in the afterlife and populate that family’s specific part of heaven on their own planet. Mormon’s claim that

the baptized can choose in the afterlife whether to accept salvation and join the church as Mormons,

but given the unknown geography of the afterlife, it is unclear how and if the deceased would be able to express their opinion, and where they would go if they chose not to live in Mormon Heaven with their adoptive family.

In response to Mormon proxy baptism, a website has set up to convert all dead Mormons to gay, and conservative talk show host Stephen Colbert proxy converted all dead Mormons to Judaism by performing a bris (circumcision) on a hotdog.

The increasing exposure of the Mormon addiction to dunking dead people against their families’ wishes could cause a Mittstorm for  GOP hopeful Willard Romney, who is a staunch adherent to Mormonism, since posthumously baptizing people without their families’ consent looks selfish and creepy, and raises questions about imposing one’s faith on another.

 

 

42 Responses to "Mormons Posthumously Baptized Slain Reporter Daniel Pearl"
Twain | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:11 pm 1

The Convert to Gay website is hilarious. I love it!


skepticdog | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:16 pm 2

As an agnostic, who cares what happens after you’re dead.


EvilDrPuma | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:21 pm 3

Mormons are technically only supposed to proxy baptize family members into the faith, one of the main reasons for church’s maintenance of detailed genealogical records. According to church officials, Pearl’s baptism was a “serious breach of protocol” because it was not performed by a relative.

There seem to be an awful lot of “serious breaches” of this protocol going on. Maybe LDS needs to learn to control its members. [/s]


EvilDrPuma | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:22 pm 4
In response to skepticdog @ 2

It isn’t about what happens after you’re dead. It’s about respect for others.


allan | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:25 pm 5

Doesn’t post-death baptism violate the First Amendment rights of the deceased and their kin?
Outrage and congressional hearings from Daryl Issa in 3,2,1, … never.


Lisa Derrick | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:27 pm 6

Keep your eyes open to see if they baptize the Monkees Davy Jones


Twain | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:30 pm 7

It would be a good idea for someone to sue the Mormons. Might stop some of this nonsense.


Broadstreetbuddy | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:33 pm 8

Man, if I was Pearl’s mother or father in my case, I would have had more to say than, “As a matter of ethics, I think its wrong.”

Hes not my kid and I still have more to say, but most of it would get flagged by the censors . . .


EvilDrPuma | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:34 pm 9
In response to Twain @ 7

They can probably lawyer up pretty well. Look at the amount of cash they’ve sunk into PropH8.


Watt4Bob | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:35 pm 10

So, let me get this straight…

…after I die, I might wonder, lost for decades through some vague eternity, only to suddenly face the choice to accept a salvation I was unaware existed because some mormon person decided I could use a posthumous baptism?

Do they have a do-not-call list?


Twain | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:37 pm 11

EDP – plenty of money for sure but the bad publicity would hurt them. I doubt that most people in the country even know that they are doing this. Citizens might be a little bothered by the Mormons scooping up their dead relatives and transporting them to Mormon “heaven.”


EvilDrPuma | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:37 pm 12
In response to Watt4Bob @ 10

Do they have a do-not-call list?

Well, supposedly the Jews were supposed to be excused from posthumous baptism, but it looks like that simply gets ignored when inconvenient.


Twain | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:38 pm 13

Watt4Bob, that is truly funny. Thanks for the laugh.


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:43 pm 14

The Mormon practice of baptizing dead people who aren’t Mormons has just hit a new low. Last week it was revealed that Anne Frank was posthumously baptized for the ninth time, and now the Boston Globe reports that Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, who was kidnapped and slain by Islamic terrorists in Karachi, Pakistan, in 2002, was posthumously baptized in June, 2011. The proxy baptism was conducted in a Mormon temple in Twin Falls, Idaho.

Pearl’s family was not notified of his forced afterlife conversion at the time, and only learned of it from the Globe. Pearl’s widow Mariane said the baptism showed

Baptism is a religious ritual its magic but thats ok because God approves. When you baptize the dead then the religious ritual becomes Necromancy…something all the Christian churches object too.
It is only in this age of science where nobody believes in magic that even church authorities don’t care to mention the obvious.
If you die and believe in God and the One true Faith whatever faith that maybe you go to heaven if you die and don’t believe you go to hell God makes that call humans don’t.
Also humans have free will the Mormons claim to bind a soul and save it by baptizing people who never in life wanted to be Mormon is not excused by we just want everyone to go to heaven.


Broadstreetbuddy | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:44 pm 15
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 12

Yeah the same goes for the real “do not call” list. we still get lots of calls.

Only this is a more serious matter.


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:47 pm 16

Luke 16:19-31 “Now there was a certain rich man, and he was clothed in purple and fine linen, living in luxury every day. A certain beggar, named Lazarus, was laid at his gate, full of sores, and desiring to be fed with the crumbs that fell from the rich man’s table. Yes, even the dogs came and licked his sores. It happened that the beggar died, and that he was carried away by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died, and was buried. In Hades, he lifted up his eyes, being in torment, and saw Abraham far off, and Lazarus at his bosom.
He cried and said, ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue! For I am in anguish in this flame.’

“But Abraham said, ‘Son, remember that you, in your lifetime, received your good things, and Lazarus, in like manner, bad things. But now here he is comforted and you are in anguish. Besides all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed, that those who want to pass from here to you are not able, and that none may cross over from there to us.’

He said, ‘I ask you therefore, father, that you would send him to my father’s house; for I have five brothers, that he may testify to them, so they won’t also come into this place of torment.’

“But Abraham said to him,
‘They have Moses and the prophets. Let them listen to them.’

“He said, ‘No, father Abraham, but if one goes to them from the dead, they will repent.’

“He said to him, ‘If they don’t listen to Moses and the prophets,
neither will they be persuaded if one rises from the dead.’” (web)

http://www.bcbsr.com/survey/pbl36.html
Notice even though the rich man repented after death he still did not get to heaven and even the biblical Abraham did not think or want to save the rich man.
I know of nothing in the bible that supports the Mormons on this point.


lordgoogoo | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:49 pm 17

Did none of the first 8 baptisms of Anne Frank stick?


TalkingStick | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:51 pm 18

A number of my Puritan ancestors have been engulfed by the Mormon amoeba. The Mormons also make up genealogical connections. I have a Rice relative who came in the 17th century Great Migrations. The Mormans decided he was descended from the Rhys princes of Wales and Tudors. (they have been posthumously engulfed also.) There is absolutely no evidence of such a connection. We have posted the disclaimer many places but they still keep it in their database.

On the other hand I am kind of enjoying wearing that broad blue sash like the one the Queen wears. :-)


EvilDrPuma | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:51 pm 19
In response to lordgoogoo @ 17

Seems badly coordinated to me…and that’s not my usual impression of how the LDS does things.


newcarguy | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:52 pm 20
In response to Watt4Bob @ 10

“Do they have a do-not-call list?”
—–
That WAS funny!!!

I wonder if Marc Zuckerberrg is aware of the potential of such a site.


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:54 pm 21

Deuteronomy 18:9-12 ESV / 7 helpful votes

“When you come into the land that the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominable practices of those nations. There shall not be found among you anyone who burns his son or his daughter as an offering, anyone who practices divination or tells fortunes or interprets omens, or a sorcerer or a charmer or a medium or a necromancer or one who inquires of the dead, for whoever does these things is an abomination to the Lord. And because of these abominations the Lord your God is driving them out before you.

Necro means Death Mancy means magic if you baptize the dead even if its to save them and get them to Mormon heaven you are doing Necromancy.
Also only God if you believe in religion decides who gets to heaven after they die not Men so the Mormons are guilty of Hubris also pride of being greater than the God (s).
Theologically just WTF are they thinking?

http://www.openbible.info/topics/necromancy


newcarguy | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:55 pm 22
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 19

I agree. But, we must remembet there are some “wayward” sects of the LDS, like the ones in Texas and Arizona that were led by that Jeffs guy. THEY could be the problem.


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:57 pm 23

If Mitt as President decides he is the Father of our Country like George Washington was will he think he can baptize every American from the Founding Fathers to us here today?


newcarguy | Wednesday February 29, 2012 01:58 pm 24
In response to ThingsComeUndone @ 21

WOW! You always have such interesting contributions. Could you enlighten me on this “Deuteronomy”. I though “he” was a character in “Cats”.


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:02 pm 25
In response to newcarguy @ 24

Cats has nothing on the bible as far as creative fiction goes:)


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:03 pm 26

I admit bible arguments don’t mean much to the real world or us Lefties especially but they should mean something to GOP fundy voters.


skepticdog | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:04 pm 27

Hey, I even bought a bicycle.


skepticdog | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:08 pm 28
In response to skepticdog @ 27

And I have a strange compulsion to marry multiple wives. Do you think they did something to me?


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:08 pm 29

We should ask Rick S if he would support the Republican Nominee after the Primary its a common question this election the press asks Ron Paul this question all the time.
Rick says yes as we would expect then we ask Rick if Mitt were to baptize your parents assuming they are dead would you still support Mitt?


ThingsComeUndone | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:10 pm 30

We should ask the very religious Rick S if he would support Mitt as President if the Mormons baptized his parents assuming Rick’s Parents are dead.


Lisa Derrick | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:24 pm 31
In response to skepticdog @ 2

It’s just rude to impose one’s belief system on another, even if they are dead. And for family members and friends to learn that a loved one has been dunked after death into a faith they didn’t believe in is just awful. It’s kinda like sneaking a Mormon a shot of espresso in a cup of cocoa.

The Mormons are being pushy and thoughtless, and if this is the sort of thing that Mormons do, why, I sure as sugar won’t be voting for Mitt Romney.


maa8722 | Wednesday February 29, 2012 02:47 pm 32

Well, it is kind of creepy and bizarre.

Still, why should anyone care what any religious group does behind closed doors or in the dark of night? I think of it as sort of like a fraternity initiation in absentia.

Certainly Daniel Pearl’s ghost (if there is one) couldn’t care less.


newcarguy | Wednesday February 29, 2012 03:21 pm 33
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 31

I had a friend in shool who was Mormon. He couldn’t drink COke because the church outlawed it. It had “drugs” in it. Caffeine. We had to get him some Dr. Pepper at school functions. Of course, when I was in charge of refreshments, I just TOLD him it was Dr. pepper.


ethelbramble | Wednesday February 29, 2012 03:52 pm 34

Response to ThingsComeUndone:

The Mormons have their own Bible, so they don’t care what YOUR Bible says. I never met a religious freak who didn’t treat God as if it was a ball, and made up their own game rules AND played the part of referee. Religion as sport is just for competitive men and women the rest of us who are interested in process and moving along with the changes in the world, have no interest in churchies. I met the grandson of Mr. Smith one time, knocking on doors. He freely admitted he didn’t understand or believe the religion he was touting. Any religion can be abusive.


northwestbynorth | Wednesday February 29, 2012 04:09 pm 35

We are all Mormons now.


AitchD | Wednesday February 29, 2012 04:10 pm 36

… given the unknown geography of the afterlife …

Galileo’s telescopes could see some of Jupiter’s moons, which meant he had to spend his afterlife either retired to his garden or in hell.

Speaking of Galileo, and of the uninvited insinuations onto the departed, you know some of his remains have been preserved, including one of his teeth, which a dentist examined and declared that Galileo suffered gastric acid reflux and ground his teeth in his sleep.


nonpartisanliberal | Wednesday February 29, 2012 04:44 pm 37

I don’t understand why anyone should be upset by harmless and pointless practices by a bunch of goofy Mormons.


jrubin998 | Wednesday February 29, 2012 05:08 pm 38

If they did it secretively before the Holocaust, then the final solution should have been stopped by them.

The problem probably was George & his father couldn’t speak up from Mexico – they spoke another language.

And Williard was just an anchor baby later!


lordgoogoo | Wednesday February 29, 2012 05:10 pm 39
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 19

I’ll refrain from stating my usual impression of Mormons, but I will say that the only ones I’ve ever had any positive feelings for were The King Family and certain Osmonds.


robspierre | Wednesday February 29, 2012 06:46 pm 40

Awwhhh, come on! I’m a Catholic. I don’t believe any of the Mormon theology. But posthumous conversion remains evidence of a charitable disposition, in my opinion. Naive. Simple-minded even. But essentially benevolent. You might almost say that Mormons are the only religion that allows double-dipping: choose one faith and, if you choose wrong, still get a chance to be saved by another for free!

The relatively few Mormons that I have known well have all been well-meaning and sincere. Over earnest, often. Narrow-minded, fairly often. Overbearing and bigoted occasionally. But I give something like this the benefit of the doubt.

After all, I believe that Mormons are tragically WRONG about the afterlife. Their baptism can’t save them much less affect a dead me in any way. But this is a case where it’s the thought that counts. So I pray for Mormons. And I always ask them to pray for me. I find it’s the best way to send missionaries on their way with no hard feelings in minimum time–and you can never have too much insurance.

Also, it’s a minor point, but as a Mormon acquaintance once explained this to me, if we are human, we are ALL relatives. He was pretty sure his church had already done Adam and Eve. So the rest of us are at most distant cousins.


TalkingStick | Wednesday February 29, 2012 07:03 pm 41
In response to nonpartisanliberal @ 37

I don’t know why I am upset in my family’s case but somehow I am. I think it has to do with feeling a lack of respect for our boundaries and identity.

I do think they do genuine harm by making up genealogical information.

That is if you prefer to know your ancestors as the people who contributed to your own gene pool. But then so many folks seem to just look for connection with some sort of medieval royal, I guess my own family’s renouncing the garbage the Mormans have created out of their imagination is not that common.


robspierre | Wednesday February 29, 2012 07:32 pm 42
In response to TalkingStick @ 41

I guess we differ in that I think my control over my boundaries and identity ends with me and the grave. My kids, my neighbors, the historians, etc. will always be able to think what they want, no matter what the Mormons–or I–think.

I also don’t really care that much about respect, except for self-respect. The Mormons can think what they want about me and my largely non-Catholic ancestors (some of whom were probably monastery-burning, church-sacking, heavy-drinking heathens). But Mormons can’t change what I think, any more than the Pope can. So, if Mormons want to “save” me and mine, I’ll take that as a good intention on their part, even if I don’t think they can actually pull it off. Bless ‘em for trying, because I can use all the help that I can get.


Sorry but the comments are closed on this post

Close