Late Night: Religions Do the Right thing in Alabama. And Then There’s Michele Bachmann’s Faith

Gods bless the churches in Alabama where leaders of Episcopal, Methodist and Roman Catholic churches, representing 338,000 Alabama residents, filed suit Monday to block enforcement of the state’s new immigration law, claiming it prevents free exercise of religion. The Southern Poverty Law Center has also filed a suit opposing the law.

The law, signed by Governor Robert Bentley on June 9 and set to go into effect September 1, broadens police powers, requiring local authorities to identify illegal immigrants. Alabama is the fifth state to enact legislation which

requires police officers to verify the immigration status of anyone they stop and suspect may be in the U.S. illegally. Businesses must use a federal database called E-Verify to determine whether job applicants are eligible to work. In addition, the measure makes it a crime to rent housing to illegal immigrants.

Bishop Robert J. Baker of the Birmingham Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Alabama said in a statement that the law:

interferes with the biblical imperative of hospitality which our churches have adopted and encoded in various documents of governance. It aims to shut the doors of our churches and social ministries, against our wills, to a whole class of people, denying them access to such basic human needs as food, clothing, shelter, and, most importantly, worship of God.

It was lack of hospitality which lead to the fall of Sodom and Gomorrah

And in other religion news, lots of Americans are just ignorant, according a poll conducted by Public Religion Research Institute in partnership with Religion News Service.

Most Americans (56 percent) say it’s important for a candidate to have strong beliefs, even if those beliefs differ from their own…Yet the religious groups most firmly behind this point — white evangelicals (73 percent) and ethnic minority Christians (74 percent) — often falter when asked about politicians’ religions.

For instance, 44 percent of white evangelicals know that Romney is a Mormon. At the same time, more than eight in 10 evangelicals say Mormon religious beliefs greatly differ from their own.

And while only one in three Americans can identify President Obama’s sect of Christianity (oh come on that’s splitting hairs, since he is currently an “unaffiliated Christian” and a former member of the United Church of Christ; seriously, what sect did Reagan belong to? Bush 1? Ford?), 18% still think the President is a Muslim!

In other findings:

At a little more than 70 percent, Republicans and Tea Party members are significantly more likely than Democrats (51 percent) to say it’s important for a presidential candidate to have strong religious beliefs. Tea Party members (46 percent) are even more likely than Republicans as a whole (38 percent) to say it is “very” important for a candidate to have strong religious beliefs.

Gary Scott Smith, an expert on presidential religions at Grove City College in Pennsylvania, told Religious News Service that white evangelicals

are going to be more likely to vote Republican, even if the party nominates someone who isn’t known for strong faith commitments. And if they don’t recognize that Romney’s a Mormon by now, then you wonder how attuned they are to politics anyway.

He added that

Americans have traditionally elected presidents who use religious language and seek divine guidance, especially when grappling with the moral conflicts of the day, provided that their beliefs are relatively mainstream and don’t conflict with national security.

And then there’s this–

—White evangelicals are the group most likely to say they don’t know what Bachmann’s beliefs are (51 percent), even though she attends a Baptist church, and only 35 percent say she has similar religious beliefs to them. [Thank gods on the latter!]

56 Responses to "Late Night: Religions Do the Right thing in Alabama. And Then There’s Michele Bachmann’s Faith"
DrDick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:04 pm 1

Dayam! That might almost make me change my mind about the value of organized religion. Almost.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:11 pm 2
In response to DrDick @ 1

Most people have a good day once in a while. Michele Bachmann, however, is a monster any day of the week.


Margaret | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:14 pm 3

It seems they can be great or abominable. Christians seem to have no middle ground.


DrDick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:15 pm 4
In response to EvilDrPuma @ 2

Michele Bachmann has a good day every day. Sadly, her “good days” consist of making everyone else’s day really shitty.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:16 pm 5

Whew! just scored a parking place–tomorrow is street cleaning, and it gets vicious!


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:16 pm 6

Hey Lisa, d’ja hear the guy from Texas or thereabouts call in to coast2coast the other night about the hostels (I think he said ‘hospice’, but I don’t grasp Texan well) his organization operate and service, giving shelter, food, money even, to undocumented people, he was concerned about the debt crisis and the cuts of funding that his organization depends on? Ian Punnit was unsympathetic and then antisympathetic, saying so what if there’s no longer a reason to attract such folk.


EvilDrPuma | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:17 pm 7
In response to Margaret @ 3

They do, but the media won’t be reporting about that.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:17 pm 8
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 5

Do your neighbors place rusty old porch chairs in ‘their’ spaces so no one takes them, like they did where I used to live?


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:18 pm 9
In response to AitchD @ 6

missed it, my internet only holds radio for a few mins at a time and i don’t have a real radio.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:24 pm 10
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 9

Punnett is also an ordained Deacon of the Episcopal Church.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:25 pm 11
In response to AitchD @ 8

Well one guy used to drive over from another block, park his van, and set up street bureau saw horses, walk back home, then drive over with his girl friend later, and move the saw horses so she had a space. Chivalrous, but selfish. Someone flattened his tires.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:29 pm 12
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 9

Ah. I didn’t go to Detective School, but I’d guess you’ve listened to c2c in your car.


Margaret | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:30 pm 13

tanbark | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:36 pm 14

Well, it’s time to gin up some ’34 Nurenburg rallies to protect us from all that furrin jizzum…and judging from this piece of vicious lunacy, it could happen any day now.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:39 pm 15
In response to AitchD @ 12

Yes, I do on those nights when I am out at the right time I usually catch about 20 mins of it, some of which will be ads for survival food and gold.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:39 pm 16
In response to Margaret @ 13

That’s funny (but I think it may have been spoofing Judaism where the Holy of Holies can never be uttered except on one occasion of the year by the rabbi).

And Christianity wasn’t abominable (like now) until the TV put Jerry Falwell on at least once a week since the 1970s.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:40 pm 17
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 15

and ads for very very expensive AM radios


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:40 pm 18
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 15

My fave episode was the “zombie war” that took place over several days in some faraway part of Russia. Oddly there were no media reports of this, except on c2c. No doubt because all the reporters were eaten first!


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:41 pm 19
In response to AitchD @ 17

If C2C advertisers send me one of those radios, I would listen more religiously.


DrDick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:41 pm 20
In response to AitchD @ 16

You haven’t spent near enough time in the South. The Talibangelicals have always been this nasty, mean, and obnoxious. They just didn’t used to vote very much.


Margaret | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:51 pm 21
In response to AitchD @ 16

Haven’t you seen the movie? Of course they were spoofing Judaism. And Christianity.


DrDick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:52 pm 22

Time for me to toddle off. Going fishing again in the morning. Caught a lovely 14 inch brown this morning (who made an equally lovely dinner tonight). Take care all.


Dearie | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:53 pm 23
In response to DrDick @ 20

Oh, I think they voted. But they never used to have a dedicated TV/Radio group like Fox to keep ‘em stirred up and also united, too.


wsmoke | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:55 pm 24

Lying,cheating,theft,embezzlement,bribery,murder,treason,terrorism, these are all signs of a good christian politician? If these are good christians no wonder our country is so screwed up. How can people listen to these individuals spout off about their christian values and then watch what they do and still believe their christians? How jaded we have become.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 08:55 pm 25
In response to AitchD @ 16

Lon Milo Duquette theorizes that the unpronounceable name of God came about as a result of the rabbi approaching the Holy of Holies (with a rope attached to him), and as the Ark was basically a giant electrical generator (read the discription) when the rabbi touched it he would shout
Yeeeeee hooooo wwwwwaaaaaaaaah!

Or sounds approximately that….


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:01 pm 26
In response to DrDick @ 20

I live in the South, in Charlotte where the PTL Club started, but I’m a Yankee from PA. I went to a Christian liberal arts college in central Ohio in the 1960s, its church affiliation was the Evangelical United Brethren church, strictly Fundamentalist. Yet the school and students were liberal and progressive in most respects, especially regarding the love of learning. No one was whacky there. Now the school is associated with the Methodist church.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:02 pm 27

Hahahahahaha!


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:02 pm 28
In response to DrDick @ 22

Awesome, sleep well, and enjoy the fishies!


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:03 pm 29
In response to Margaret @ 21

Nope (I’m culturally deprived, I know), but that clip was very funny.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:07 pm 30
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 18

I tuned in in the middle of that show, I was believing it, but thought the zombie stuff was possibly metaphorical, but I believed about the epidemic and imminent threat. Then it was revealed as a spoof. I’m so ashamed.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:12 pm 31
In response to Dearie @ 23

They had the PTL Club (Jim & Tammy Faye) and the 700 Club (Pat Robertson). FOX became the secular version.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:14 pm 32
In response to AitchD @ 30

Interesting. Basically meth turns people into zombies. So the premise was that it had been some sort of epidemic?


Dearie | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:17 pm 33
In response to AitchD @ 31

And spread the phony baloney far and wide. Ain’t it fun. Amen.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:20 pm 34
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 32

Maybe we’re talking about different shows. I heard an author talking about an epidemic and his projections for the very near future, he talked about zombies, about how any of us could be attacked and made dead like them, and it happens all the time. For the entire show until it was revealed as a parody.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:22 pm 35
In response to Dearie @ 33

Amen, and to repeat: TV has done to our society what Monsanto did to corn and soy.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:25 pm 36
In response to AitchD @ 34

The one I heard, the guy was talking about how there had been a zombie epidemic in Russia with a battle that lasted several days. This was gosh at least a year ago, maybe closer to two… It was an author.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:30 pm 37

But a google search shows 3/26/11…weird. I can recall where I was driving the night I heard it, and I def wasn’t there when I was listening to this…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WEouMbE0ZI


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:34 pm 39
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 36

This is what I heard, with Max Brooks the author (from 10/17/09)


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:34 pm 40

World War Z, it’s an “oral history” of the zombie war, a novel by the guy who wrote Zombie Survival Guide.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:37 pm 41
In response to AitchD @ 39

Yes, Oct 09 I was driving back and forth from Echo Park after the death of a close friend, and I recall hearing this coasting down his hill, this would have been 6 days after his death. The show kinda nicely distracted, excited and amused me for the 13 minutes or so it took to get home.


Margot | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:38 pm 42

You’re so right about hospitality being a very big deal. What if you should turn away “an angel unaware”?


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:41 pm 43
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 40

I probably heard some of the Zombie Survival Guide. Of course the guy’s a wizard, being the son of Mel and Ann.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:45 pm 44
In response to Margot @ 42

The wonderful British author, Saki (H.H. Munroe) wrote that you should never be rude to a man with a beard; he might turn out to be the King of Norway.


Margot | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:47 pm 45
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 44

Saki! I remember reading him. Well that’s a great author to re-read, thanks Lisa.


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:48 pm 46
In response to Margot @ 42

We weren’t religious at all in my family, but we learned a zillion rules like There’s always room here for more. (My grandparents took in Danny Kaye ne Kaminsky. Meyer Lansky used the hedges next to their front stoop in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, to stake out Abie Rellis’s car, then jumped on the running board when it drove past, but his gun jammed.)


Dearie | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:51 pm 47
In response to Margot @ 42

I’m curious. The first time I heard ‘angel unaware’ was Dale Evans story about her child who died young. What references do you mean?


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:53 pm 48
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 44

If you can digest cow’s milk, there’s some Viking DNA in your bloodcestry. The went everywhere in the day.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:55 pm 49
In response to Margot @ 45

Check out the novella “When William Came.” All his stuff is available on Gutenburg for free downlaoding.


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:57 pm 50

AitchD, there was Jewish Vikings! The Norsemen came down through Eastern Europe and captured Ashkenazi Jewish women in their pillaging…


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 09:59 pm 51
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 50

And blond/e/red/strawberry blond/e Greeks and Italians…


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 10:03 pm 52

Re the blog’s topic: Do you know Shirley Jones, Lisa? She’s maybe the only surviving star from Elmer Gantry. It would be great if you did a FDL Movie Night of Elmer Gantry with her!


Lisa Derrick | Tuesday August 2, 2011 10:05 pm 53
In response to AitchD @ 52

Well, it’s worth a try…


AitchD | Tuesday August 2, 2011 10:13 pm 54
In response to Lisa Derrick @ 53

You could sugar-coat the try, she grew up in Pittsburgh, a lot of FDL folks live there or used to live there. We’re practically family!


skepticdog | Wednesday August 3, 2011 04:21 am 55

Some churches have supported immigration from Mexico. I don’t think they’re really trying to help anyone. They want the increased revenues….


nonpartisanliberal | Wednesday August 3, 2011 05:16 am 56

Bachmann makes a big deal about being a Christian. I have learned to never trust anyone who makes a big deal about being a Christian. Such people are the quintessential religious hypocrites who are putting on a false front of piety while looking to swindle you at their first opportunity.


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